Magic as Power: The Influence of Marsilio Ficino on Early Modern Conceptions of the Occult

dc.contributor.authorOseman, Arlene
dc.contributor.editorHouliston, Victor
dc.coverage.spatialUniversity of the Witwatersrand, Braamfontein , Johannesburg
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14T11:15:35Z
dc.date.available2019-02-14T11:15:35Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.description.abstractGiven the immense scholarship yielded, inter alia, by theological, anthropological, cultural, linguistic and literary studies, it is now widely recognised that Renaissance magic was accepted as an eclectic, though respected, philosophical science, painstakingly considered and practised by the most eminent scholars of the time.1 Indeed, until the advent of modern European rationalism, magic and other occult practices were deemed to have a distinguished intellectual, even sacred, pedigree, and were treated as valid elements in the histories of religion, epistemology and science.2 Thus Keith Thomas can rightfully claim that ‘For much of the period . . . magical inquiry possessed some intellectual respectability. . . . Small wonder that for the populace learning still meant magic’.3en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.sasmars.wordpress.com
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12430/24
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherThe Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (SASMARS)en_ZA
dc.subjectMiddle Ages -- Periodicals. Renaissance -- Periodicals. Middle Ages. Renaissance.en_ZA
dc.titleMagic as Power: The Influence of Marsilio Ficino on Early Modern Conceptions of the Occulten_ZA
dc.title.alternativeSouthern African Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
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