'Well may I view her, but she sees not me': Marlowe's Dido, Queen of Carthage.

dc.contributor.authorRoux, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-21T14:27:45Z
dc.date.available2021-01-21T14:27:45Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.description.abstractAmidst all this "self-fashioning", which has engendered a vast and diverse critical literature, one Marlovian protagonist is conspicuous in his almost perverse failure to author himself: Aeneas, in Marlowe's Dido, Queen of Carthage. In fact, as the paucity of recent critical material on Dido indicates, Aeneas is one of the leftovers of the big New Historicist and Cultural Materialist feast; he wouldn't "go down", so to speak. The contention of this paper is that Marlowe's Aeneas' exceptional status is of crucial importance in adding to our understanding of the emergence of the subject under humanism, and that he offers a way beyond historicist commonplaces concerning the creation of an autonomous "self" in the Renaissance.en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation'Well may I view her, but she sees not me': Marlowe's Dido, Queen of Carthage,1017-3455,The Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn1017-3455
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12430/549356
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherThe Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (SASMARS)en_ZA
dc.title'Well may I view her, but she sees not me': Marlowe's Dido, Queen of Carthage.en_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
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